• Saint-Léger church

    Churches and shrines

Saint-Léger church

Resorts: Aymavilles

The crypt is closed until 1 July 2022

Possibility of extraordinary openings, on reservation, for groups of over 15 people and with an additional price of 2 € on the access ticket.

Opening times are subject to variations: we advice to verify them on the web site reported in the “Contact” area.

Fares for visits at the crypt

Full-price ticket: 3

Reduced entrance-fee: 1,50 € students aged up to 25 years (from 19 to 25 years with document certifying the student’s condition), persons accompanying disabled visitors, groups led by tour or nature guides and Abbonamento Musei owners.

Free entry: children aged up to 6 years, disabled visitors, people living in the municipalities of Fondation Grand Paradis (Aymavilles, Cogne, Introd, Rhêmes-Saint-Georges, Rhêmes-Notre-Dame, Valsavarenche, Villeneuve), tour or nature guides.

Reductions: for owners of “Carta Amico di Cogne”, Touring Club Italiano members and their families, persons accompanying Touring Club Junior’s members and owners of the access ticket to Parc Animalier d’Introd, Bard Fortress, M.A.V.

The visit is included in the Fondation Grand Paradis joint ticket (full price € 8.00, reduced entrance-fee € 4.00), valid for a year from the date of issue for visiting the sites run by the Fondation Grand Paradis.

Contacts

Slightly upstream from the village centre of Aymavilles, along the road that leads to Cogne, the church with its characteristic “trompe-l’oeil” façade, in its current forms, dates back to 1762, but the belltower originates from the previous building, on it there is a rare fourteenth century bell.

The trompe l’oeil façade was painted in 1857 by the painter Grange: in the center the martyrdom of St. Léger, and on the sides the saints Joseph, Germano, Grato and Leonard.
The main altar was made in 1856 by the sculptor Freydoz of Brusson. The organ was built in 1848 by G. N. Cesa.

In the basement it conceals a small crypt, which is attributed to the 9th-10th century. Later enlarged, it had to have three naves (one would have been destroyed or incorporated into the northern wall of the current church).

The relative parish was separated from the other one of Aymavilles, dedicated to Saint-Martin, at the end of the 18th century.